Acton Ostry Architects

October 2021

Urbanarium The Mixing Middle Competition

Acton Ostry Architects is pleased to be a sponsor of Urbanarium’s The Mixing Middle Competition, which calls for innovative mixed-use designs to revitalize residential areas in four Metro Vancouver communities. The aim of the competition is to create more vibrant neighbourhoods that meet the needs of intergenerational and multicultural residents through an exploration of the possibilities of multifunctional mixed uses. Creativity and ambition are encouraged. Registration is open to everyone through November 2, 2021.

The Arbour

October 2021

Construction Start

Construction has begun on The Arbour, the future home of the School of Technology at George Brown College and Canada’s first Tall Wood Research Institute. Located on Toronto’s waterfront, the ten-storey tall wood building will break new ground with a revolutionary CLT structure that is anticipated to pave the way for the widespread use of mass timber in multi-storey, larger span buildings. The Arbour is a joint venture collaboration between AOA and Moriyama & Teshima Architects.

445 Kingsway

September 2021

New Project

One of only 20 projects in the City of Vancouver’s Moderate Income Rental Housing Pilot Program, 445 Kingsway is a 14-storey mixed-use development consisting of a commercial base topped by a three-storey residential podium and two mid-rise residential towers. The transit-oriented development will provide 236 secured rental housing units, 20% of which will be moderate income rental units and 35% of which will be suitable for families with children. Extensive outdoor amenity space above the commercial podium and on the tower roofs will provide views of the adjacent Robson Park.

Acton Ostry Architects

September 2021

Canadian Architecture

Acton Ostry Architects is pleased to be included in Canadian Architecture: Evolving a Cultural Identity. Accompanied by stunning photography, the newly released book surveys the country’s most accomplished architectural firms, whose work enhances cities and landscapes across Canada’s geographically varied expanse. Author Leslie Jen explores a number of significant projects in urban and rural environments—private residences, cultural and institutional facilities, and democratic public spaces—that profoundly influence our interactions with each other and the communities in which we live. Canadian Architecture is a testament to a thriving, diverse, and innovative design culture that continues to play an integral role in shaping our national identity.